All posts filed under: Art

“Off the Cuff” with Ceramic Mosiac Artist, Jane du Rand

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA―Ceramic mosaic artist, Jane du Rand’s breathtaking artworks adorn the walls of numerous homes, hotels, spas and public spaces across South Africa and in distant locations such as Chile, The Netherlands, New York and the South of France. JournoNews was fortunate to catch-up with her for this week’s “Off the Cuff”. My secret pleasure is … my morning cuppacino with a piece of Lindt dark chocolate. My first job was … working as a photographer’s assistant, I thought it would be glamorous, but all I did was code negatives. My most annoying habits are … being single minded and obstinate. A clear childhood memory is … spending hours and hours in the swimming pool with my sister. What makes me really nervous is … month ends! The best advice my parents gave me was … to always give of my best in everything I do. If I wasn’t an artist … I was going to be an architect. I’m most thankful for … my wonderful family. My favourite meal is … I really love fresh pasta with …

“Off the Cuff” with artist Mike McMeekan

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA—Durban-born, Adelaide-adopted artist, Mike McMeekan shares a lighter side of his life as well as some of his favourite art pieces with JournoNews. My secret pleasure … I try to avoid secret pleasures – they often have a way of coming out into the light. My first job was … The clerk to a teller at a notorious two man agency of the Standard Bank in Point Road which had been robbed many times. We both had to wear side arms, and I, an 18 year old novice was given one. I felt like Dirty Harry. My most annoying habits are … As a sufferer of post nasal drip I need to clear my throat constantly, sometimes I need to spit and whilst I am cautious about the where and when; sometimes I have limited options. It can be embarrassing. A clear childhood memory is … Family sing-a-longs around the upstairs piano. What makes me really nervous is … Letting my family down. The best advice my parents gave me was … My father drilled …

Off the Cuff with artist, Deb Mostert

Contemporary visual artist, Deb Mostert lives and works from her home studio on the Ipswich/Brisbane border, Queensland, Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Fine Art from the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, Australia. To date she’s exhibited at 10 solo shows and been involved in more than 30 Group shows in a variety of exhibition spaces ranging from commercial galleries to Regional Galleries in Australia. Her main focus this year has been to get alongside people who lost possessions during the devastating Brisbane summer floods of 2011 and document their stories of loss and recovery through paintings and text. Should you wish to partner with Deb on this project and contribute to her target of over $3,000, visit http://pozible.com/floodobjectsproject. My secret pleasure is … shopping for fusty old books in second hand shops to add to my collection of fusty old books. My first job was … as a paste up artist back in the 80’s when ‘cut and paste’ was literally that. With a scalpel and rubber cement glue. Love the smell of rubber …

Talking Art with Cape Town’s Alastair Whitton

Tell us about your most recent work, ‘Patmos and the War at Sea’, dedicated to your late brother, Ronald James Whitton. The Patmos Project is an intensely layered one that essentially considers the way in which we see or rather fail to see parallel worlds and landscapes. The works also contemplate processes of interpretation and on one level are an attempt to make sense of language. Over the years you’ve also produced other inspiring artworks – Conversations with Thomas, Filter and others. Which ones have meant the most to you? Why? Conversations with Thomas and The Patmos Project remain those closest to my heart. Both were ‘made in the fire’ and their residue makes for memory. You were one of four South Africans selected for the Pan African Photography Biennale in Bamako, Mali in November 2009. Tell us about these photographs. Paris based curator, Michket Krifa the artistic director of the 2009 biennale was in Johannesburg in April and came across examples from the Patmos Project at the 2nd Johannesburg Art Fair. She selected 5 …

Art on Cairncross

Story fea­tured in Coun­try Style Mag­a­zine, 2009 Jane Caraffi grew up surrounded by books on art history and recalls being “dragged” around London galleries while her school friends were off on exciting holidays. It was only much later, on the other side of the world, that she came to fully share her father’s passion for art and to open her own gallery, Art on Cairncross, in the south Queensland town of Maleny. Jane describes her initial move to the area as “pure happenstance”. Having trained as a nurse, she began travelling and reached Queensland in 1993. When she settled in Maleny, art supplanted nursing as a preferred occupation and she found herself running a gallery. A shared interest in photography introduced her to Tony Gill, a former hospitality worker who had also turned to gallery management in nearby Montville. The shared interests blossomed into romance and marriage — and when the opportunity arose to buy their new premises and combine forces, the decision was simple. Maleny’s physical attractions would have played a part. Set in …