All posts tagged: brisbane flood

International jazz singer to perform at Fig Tree Pocket flood relief concert

A COMMUNITY JAZZ CONCERT flood fund-raiser featuring a host of talented jazz musicians including international jazz singer, Amanda Carr who sings for the famous Boston Pops Orchestra, will be held at Fig Tree Pocket State School oval, Cubberla Street, Fig Tree Pocket in Brisbane, Australia on September 17 from 4pm to 6.30pm. The event will raise funds for families still struggling to get back on their feet after January’s devastating floods. Fig Tree Pocket was one of the areas significantly affected by floodwater and long-time resident and sponsor, Joanne Bullock-Saxton has organised the event to help those still battling to regain their lives and rebuild their homes. She hopes the concert will provide a boost in spirit and finances for locals affected by the flood. “Like so many other flood-affected suburbs, we still have many who have not yet returned home and who have been hit hard by the cost of rebuilding, but we are resilient and wherever possible help each-other out and I think that quality is what has drawn such support and interest …

Piles of Excess

There was a vast difference in the standard of the ‘junk’ piled high on the curb at the height of Brisbane’s flood clean up. Some of the poorer suburbs whose inhabitants were uninsured, were cleaning what they could. The ‘save’ pile was bigger than the one headed for land fill. Having helped out in several affluent suburbs, I could only wonder if some of the mud-coated items could have been salvaged and given to a worthy recipient in a poorer suburb. I understand the panic and insurmountable task of cleaning the putrid, mud-coated contents of a home but amidst all the heartache, someone should have had the foresight to take charge and redistribute. It was simply not politically correct to even suggest such a thing. In the aftermath of the devastation, no-one was willing to take up the charge. Yet, as I observed the clearly new washable wicker furniture lying alongside a perfectly good stainless steel fridge (which according to my electrician source, could be hosed and salvaged,) I couldn’t help thinking they could be …

Exclusive suburbs hard hit by flood

A month ago, I enjoyed a work Christmas lunch at an up-market jetty restaurant overlooking the Brisbane River. And then, at the height of Brisbane’s floods, I watched in fascination as the jetty housing its outdoor restaurant, floated down the Brisbane River, collided with a bridge and sunk. Ironically, it was called Drift. Stranded in our own little outlying semi-rural suburb, we could only watch in horror and disbelief as we saw footage of familiar stomping grounds swamped by water. Friends phoned to say they were leaving their home with the water lapping window sills. In another picturesque upmarket suburb, two more friends and their families had left their homes with one saying water was expected to reach roof height. The South African couple were renting the property but as many in the suburb, submerged in the 1974 floods, were unable to get flood insurance. They managed to remove a few items including treasured paintings, a washing machine and fridge but feared the worst. As newcomers to the country, we bought our very first home …